Trial continues in case of fan who suffered brain injury in fight

When the San Francisco Giants squared off against the Los Angeles Dodgers during the 2011 Opening Day game at Dodger Stadium, many expected a cut throat competition between these two California teams. But after the game, in the stadium’s parking lot, another clash took place that forever foreshadowed the game and begged the question: was the stadium liable for what had taken place?

Some of our San Francisco readers may remember hearing about the attack on 45-year-old Bryan Stow that left the former paramedic with permanent brain damage after hitting his head on the pavement and being kicked in the skull. As was pointed out by medical experts in the personal injury claim that was filed against the stadium, Stow may not have suffered the traumatic brain injury had security seen the altercation and stopped it before it escalated.

The plaintiffs in the case believe that a lack of security contributed to Stow’s injuries and that the stadium should be held liable for its negligence. But the stadium has argued against this point, stating that “the Dodgers had the largest security force in its history” for the game. The vice president of Stadium Operations also disagreed with the accusations of negligence stating that if the security guards had seen the altercation, they would have responded to it.

But the fact of the matter is that security did not respond to the altercation, which continues to leave the question of liability unanswered. In the upcoming days, jurors will hear the defense’s side of the story. After which, they will come to a decision about whether the victim’s family should receive upwards of $37 million in damages. If calculated right, the amount could help cover continued treatment and other medical costs as Stow ages.

Sources: Scpr.org, “Bryan Stow Trial: Expert says care, lost wages for Giants fan could total $37M,” Linda Deutsch, June16, 2014

The Los Angeles Times, “Doctors testify about Bryan Stow’s loss of intellectual capacity,” Corina Knoll, June 11, 2014

Web Statistics